Texas Longhorns Basketball Tip-Off Event Set for Tonight

I have an odd affection for a particular Denny’s menu item — I love the Moons Over My Hammy. For those who have never had it, Moons is essentially a grilled cheese sandwich with ham and scrambled eggs. It weighs in at 780 calories, half of which come from fat. It is the best. Give me one of these puppies with a side of hash browns, a bunch of hot sauce, and a quantity of coffee that can only be described as discouraging and I am about as happy as I can be.

There are other menu items at Denny’s that are decent, but none are really like the Moons Over My Hammy. Pancakes and Grand Slams are fine and I guess in a pinch they will do (but be careful, while it seems similar to Moons the Grand Slamwich is a disgusting mess of a thing filled with fake maple flavoring).

An intrasquad basketball scrimmage is a lot like being told that after not eating Denny’s for months, you won’t be allowed to eat Moons Over My Hammy for a few more weeks, but in the meantime you can tide yourself over with a Belgian Waffle Slam — and you know what, it will do; it will do just fine.

Tonight at 6:30 p.m. CDT, we get the chance to tide ourselves over with the Texas Tip-Off, Texas Basketball’s (now) annual preseason intrasquad scrimmage event. Like the past two years, this event takes place at Gregory Gym, and for the second season in a row it will air on the Longhorn Network.

Shaka Smart brings a somewhat different looking squad when compared with last season’s group, and hopefully will get different results to go with it. Three of the likely five starters on the team will be new this year, with freshmen Mohamed Bamba and Matt Coleman and junior transfer Dylan Osetkowski all slated for major roles this season.

Tonight this won’t matter, as squads will be split to produce more or less even teams and everyone will see some action. For Andrew Jones, Kerwin Roach, James Banks, Jacob Young, and Eric Davis, this will be the first chance stateside to play publicly in a while as they work to put last season behind them. For a full freshman class that in addition to Bamba and Coleman includes Jericho Sims, Jase Febres, and Royce Hamm, tonight will be a first chance to play in front of Texas fans. We might even get a first look at Elijah Long, a transfer from Mount St. Mary’s who is sitting out the year due to NCAA rules.

If you have a chance to get out to the event it will be a nice opportunity to see the team up close; Mo Bamba is really tall and Jericho Sims or Kerwin Roach might throw down some sort of crazy dunk. For the rest of us, the Longhorn Network has us covered.

So tonight, relax and watch the scrimmage. And when you are done and are hungry for more information on the team, consider pre-ordering Smart Texas Basketball 2017, available via Amazon Kindle or Apple iTunes.

Source: Burnt Orange Nation

Powered by WPeMatico

Women’s Basketball’s Atkins Plots Different Course to Success

Senior Texas guard Ariel Atkins is a firm believer that there are many routes to success. 

And success is nothing new for the 5-foot-11 Duncanville, Texas, native who is entering her final season on the Forty Acres. 

Atkins recently was named to the 2017-18 Preseason All-Big 12 Team. A year ago, she earned First-Team All-Big 12 honors and was named to the Big 12 All-Defensive team after leading the league in steals with 2.0 takeaways per game. Atkins also garnered Honorable Mention All-America recognition from the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association in 2016-17. 

Her leadership qualities are unmistakable and have been on display since her early days at Duncanville High School, where she was a McDonald’s All-American and led her team to a pair of Texas UIL Class 5A State Championships, a 105-game winning streak and a combined record of 148-10. 

“It was obvious in high school and she has stayed very consistent with who she is every day,” Texas head coach Karen Aston said. “She sets the tone for our team and makes sure that we are on track. She is a very good communicator.”

While the team has high expectations for the upcoming season, the Longhorns – who have made three consecutive NCAA Sweet 16 appearances – are focused on the present. And as the team’s vocal leader, Atkins understands it’s her role – along with fellow seniors Audrey-Ann Caron-Goudreau and Brooke McCarty – to keep the team focused on the process. 

“Just take it day-by-day,” Atkins said. “I think it’s really important for the personnel and the team that we have to really focus on the present and not think about anything that is to come.”

Striving for excellence on a daily basis is one of Atkins’ innate qualities and now, entering her senior campaign, she is poised to use that strength to help her team achieve its full potential. 

In addition to her on-court success, Atkins has earned Academic All-Big 12 honors each of her three seasons in Austin and was a 2017 nominee to the Allstate WBCA Good Works Team, which recognizes excellence in community service. She is the epitome of a well-rounded student-athlete. 

“It’s who she is,” Aston said. “She wakes up every morning and goes to bed every night trying to figure out how to be great. She’s not afraid to talk about her weaknesses and she’s not afraid to ask questions. It’s really not normal to see a young person like that who is willing to get outside of themselves and really to get outside of the basketball world to make themselves better.”

Professional basketball is a definite and realistic goal for Atkins once she has completed her eligibility and earned her sport management degree from the University of Texas. But she also has aspirations to start an organization that helps young people through education and basketball. 

It’s a concept that dates back to her high school anatomy class, where teacher Lee Martin opened Atkins’ eyes to how unconventional methods can get children and youth excited about learning and new ideas that form the roadmap to their futures.  

“The way she taught us wasn’t normal,” Atkins said. “She took a different approach to education and that’s kind of the basis for my organization. I want to take a different approach with kids and make them excited about something that would otherwise seem repetitive. We did art work in her anatomy class. She definitely opened my mind and I was able to see so much change in how I thought about anatomy. It inspired me.” 

Throughout her life, family has been the bedrock for Atkins. Her parents, Byron and LaShonda, created a strong foundation for the person the 21-year-old Atkins has become. She has long been motivated by a message that her mother has instilled in her from an early age. 

“My mom has always told me to be somebody you needed or somebody you looked up to when you were younger,” Atkins said. “I’ve really tried to do that.”

Atkins’ older sister Jessica is a graduate of Texas Tech who set the tone for her two younger siblings. Atkins’ close relationship with her younger brother, B.J., provides motivation for her to consistently set an example with her actions.

“He really inspires me to know I have somebody’s eyes on me at all times,” Atkins said. “I know he watches and listens to everything I do. He really inspires me to keep pushing forward and always be somebody that he can look up to.”

Family will be the basis for Atkins’ future career goals. 

“I think it’s really important to have a family outside of your family, and I think our organization can be that for a lot of kids,” she said. “When I was younger, there were a lot of us who were all on the same basketball team for a really long time and it was fun to grow up with that group of girls and to see where we’re all at now.”

The organization she conceptualizes – called I Grind Different – will be motivated by the concept that there are multiple routes to realizing one’s dreams, and striving to find which path works best for each individual youngster. 

“There’s not one way to get somewhere,” she said. “I think that’s really important for future generations to understand. A lot of times when we look to become professional athletes, or doctors or lawyers, people end up saying that there’s this one path of going about it. There are so many roadblocks and detours, and so many different ways to attain your goals.” 

As varying as the paths may be to achieve one’s dreams, Atkins has found that there’s one constant that has boosted all successful people. 

“It’s definitely work-ethic,” she said. “If there’s a common denominator to doing something, it’s hard work. Hard work is the biggest thing that I want to be in the same sentence with my name.” 

There’s no question that by the time Atkins completes her University of Texas career, her name will be etched all throughout the school’s record book. She enters her senior campaign ranked fifth in school history in free-throw percentage at 82.1 percent and she’s 26 points away from becoming the 43rd player in school history to join the 1,000-point club. 

Atkins is poised to lead the Longhorns to new heights in 2017-18, but it’s clear that her impact isn’t just limited to what she will accomplish within the 94 feet of a basketball court.

“Wherever she wants to be, that’s what I see for her,” Aston said. “Whatever she sets her mind to do is what Ariel will do.”

Print Friendly Version

Source: Texas Sports

Powered by WPeMatico

Longhorns in the NFL: Week Six

Primetime Longhorns
Thursday Night Football
(7:25 p.m. CT) on CBS – Kansas City Chiefs (Derrick Johnson, Roy Miller) at Oakland Raiders
Sunday Night Football (7:30 p.m. CT) on NBC – Atlanta Falcons at New England Patriots (Malcolm Brown)
Monday Night Football (7:30 p.m. CT) on ESPN – Washington Redskins (Colt McCoy) at Philadelphia Eagles (Jordan Hicks, Marcus Johnson)


READ: Best friends Alex Okafor, Kenny Vaccaro combine for tone-setting Saints touchdown
WATCH: Okafor strips Matthew Stafford, Vaccaro recovers


Sam Acho, Chicago Bears
Last Week
: W, 27-24 at Baltimore (OT)
Notables/Stats: Had three solo tackles in the Bears overtime win at Baltimore.
This Week: Sunday vs. Carolina (12 p.m. CT, CBS)

Malcolm Brown, Los Angeles Rams
Last Week
: W, 27-17 at Jacksonville
Notables/Stats: Rushed three times for 17 yards in the Rams win over the Jaguars.  
This Week: Sunday vs. Arizona (12 p.m. CT, FOX, London)

Malcom Brown, New England Patriots
Last Week
: W, 24-17 at New York Jets
Notables/Stats: Made four solo tackles and a sack in a road victory over the Jets.  
This Week: Sunday vs. Atlanta (7:30 p.m. CT, NBC)

Jamaal Charles, Denver Broncos
Last Week
: L, 10-23 vs. New York Giants
Notables/Stats: Rushed five times for 19 yards and also had one reception in the Broncos’ loss on Sunday Night Football.
This Week: Sunday at Los Angeles Rams (3:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Phil Dawson, Arizona Cardinals
Last Week
: W, 38-33 vs. Tampa Bay
Notables/Stats: Was as perfect as you can get as a kicker, making all five extra point attempts, knocking his lone field goal through and registering touchbacks on all seven kickoffs.  
This Week: Sunday vs. Los Angeles Rams (12 p.m. CT, FOX, London)

Quandre Diggs, Detroit Lions
Last Week
: W, 52-38 vs. Detroit
Notables/Stats: Had two tackles in Sunday’s shootout loss to New Orleans.  
This Week: BYE

D’Onta Foreman, Houston Texans
Last Week
: W, 33-17 vs. Cleveland
Notables/Stats: Rushed 12 times for a team-high 59 yards in the win over the Browns.  
This Week: BYE

Marquise Goodwin, San Francisco 49ers
Last Week
: L, 24-26 at Washington
Notables/Stats: Had two catches for 26 yards and one rush for six yards, as the 49ers lost their fifth straight game by three points or less.    
This Week: Sunday vs. Dallas (3:05 p.m. CT, FOX)

Jordan Hicks, Philadelphia Eagles
Last Week
: W, 28-23 at Carolina
Notables/Stats: Made four tackles (two solo) as the Eagles went on the road for a win at Carolina on Thursday Night Football.    
This Week: Monday vs. Washington (7:30 p.m. CT, ESPN)

Trey Hopkins, Cincinnati Bengals
Last Week
: BYE
This Week: Sunday at Pittsburgh (3:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Lamarr Houston, Houston Texans
Last Week
: W, 33-17 vs. Cleveland
Notables/Stats: Signed with the Texans and had a sack and a forced fumble in his first game.  
This Week: BYE

Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs
Last Week
: L, 13-19 vs. Pittsburgh
Notables/Stats: Totaled six tackles (three solo) as the Chiefs lost 19-13 to the Steelers for their first loss of the season.    
This Week: Thursday at Oakland (7:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Marcus Johnson, Philadelphia Eagles
Last Week
: W, 28-23 at Carolina
Notables/Stats: Had one catch for 16 yards in a Thursday Night Football road win at Carolina.  
This Week: Monday vs. Washington (7:30 p.m. CT, ESPN)

Colt McCoy, Washington Redskins
Last Week
: W, 26-24 vs. San Francisco
This Week: Monday at Philadelphia (7:30 p.m. CT, ESPN)

Roy Miller, Kansas City Chiefs
Last Week
: L, 13-19 vs. Pittsburgh
This Week: Thursday at Oakland (7:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Alex Okafor, New Orleans Saints
Last Week
: W, 52-38 vs. Detroit
Notables/Stats: Totaled two tackles, a sack, a pass breakup and forced a fumble that was recovered by fellow Longhorn Kenny Vaccaro for a TD in the win.
This Week: Sunday at Green Bay (12 p.m. CT, FOX)

Brian Orakpo, Tennessee Titans
Last Week
: W, 36-22 vs. Indianapolis
Notables/Stats: Had one tackle in the Titans victory over Indianapolis on Monday Night Football.
This Week: Sunday at Cleveland (12 p.m. CT, CBS)

Adrian Phillips, Los Angeles Chargers
Last Week
: W, 17-16 at Oakland
Notables/Stats: Totaled two tackles as the Chargers picked up their second straight win.   
This Week: Sunday vs. Denver (3:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Hassan Ridgeway, Indianapolis Colts
Last Week
: L, 22-36 at Tennessee
This Week: Sunday vs. Jacksonville (12 p.m. CT, CBS)

Keenan Robinson, New York Giants
Last Week
: W, 23-10 at Denver
Notables/Stats: Made six tackles (five solo) and two pass breakups in the Sunday Night Football victory at Denver.     
This Week: Sunday vs. Seattle (3:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Brian Robison, Minnesota Vikings
Last Week
: W, 23-10 at Minnesota
Notables/Stats: Had three tackles, a sack and a pass breakup in a 23-10 victory over Green Bay.      
This Week: Sunday vs. Baltimore (12 p.m. CT, CBS)

Geoff Swaim, Dallas Cowboys
Last Week
: BYE
This Week: Sunday at San Francisco (3:05 p.m. CT, FOX)

Earl Thomas, Seattle Seahawks
Last Week
: BYE
Notables/Stats: Enjoyed his bye week after earning NFC Defensive Player of the Week in week 5.
This Week: Sunday at New York Giants (3:25 p.m. CT, CBS)

Justin Tucker, Baltimore Ravens
Last Week
: L, 24-27 vs. Chicago (OT)
Notables/Stats: Continues to heat up, making all three field goals for the second straight game … also made his lone extra point attempt and totaled two touchbacks.
This Week: Sunday at Minnesota (12 p.m. CT, CBS)

Kenny Vaccaro, New Orleans Saints
Last Week
: W, 52-38 vs. Detroit
Notables/Stats: Had four tackles, three pass breakups, an interception returned 11 yards and a fumble recovery for a TD that was forced by fellow Longhorn Alex Okafor in the 52-38 win over Detroit.
This Week: Sunday at Green Bay (12 p.m. CT, FOX)

Fozzy Whittaker, Carolina Panthers
Last Week
: L, 23-28 vs. Philadelphia
This Week: Sundat at Chicago (12 p.m. CT, CBS)

Print Friendly Version

Source: Texas Sports

Powered by WPeMatico

The Longhorn Republic looks at missed opportunities against Oklahoma

Gerald Goodridge and Kyle Carpenter break down what the difference was for the Texas Longhorns against the Oklahoma Sooners, why Sam Ehlinger was so successful and how to get the running game going.

Then, Kyle and Gerald try to find a weakness in the Oklahoma State Cowboys and their offense, led by Heisman candidate Mason Rudolph and the talented James Washington.

As always, Kyle and Gerald give you something specific to pay attention to in a segment called Bang the Drum.

Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes, Google Play, or Stitcher.

Intro and Outro:

Earth, Wind, Fire (Ryan Little) / CC BY-SA 4.0

Source: Burnt Orange Nation

Powered by WPeMatico

Let it ring

By James Rodriguez

Texas Athletic Director Mike Perrin arrived on the set of the Longhorn Network’s GameDay show prior to the K-State game bearing gifts for two of the University’s all-time greats.

Sitting between former Texas football stars Ricky Williams and Cory Redding, Perrin revealed a pair of small white boxes, handing one to each of them. The two men knew the contents before they even opened them.

Williams revealed a ring — a gold band with a topaz inset and white “T” — and broke into a wide grin, pretending to wipe a tear from his eye. Redding didn’t have to pretend.

“Man, stop! Man, stop!” Redding repeated in disbelief as he wrapped Perrin in a bear hug. “You know how long I’ve been waiting on this T-ring?”

After completing football careers and collecting accolades, trophies and broken records along the way, Williams and Redding recently added one more item to their already impressive résumés: a college degree.

Now they have the hardware to prove it.

For Williams and Redding, the T-rings represent the culmination of a journey that started in the late nineties, when the two stepped on campus as decorated high school athletes eager to prove themselves at the next level. The rings represent promises to their mothers, to their kids. They serve as a reminder of the unique path that took them from college classrooms to packed NFL stadiums, and back again.

“I tell my kids all the time, ‘What you start, you finish,'” Redding said. “You live by that. This is a great way to show them I started something back in 1999 and I did not stop until I finished. It was hard. It was tough. Mentally, I was beating myself down thinking I couldn’t do it. But I persevered and I made it all the way through.”

Head coach Darrell K Royal created the T-ring for Longhorn lettermen who graduated from the University, even footing the bill himself in the early days of the tradition. Over the years, the design has deviated only slightly from that original model, always retaining the simple elegance of gold, precious stone and the prominent “T”. Today it remains a symbol of both academic and athletic achievement, a piece of hardware that continues to be coveted by Texas athletes.

Perrin, who played for Royal during the late sixties and proudly wears his own T-ring, recalled his coach’s commitment to making sure his players left the University with a degree in hand.

“To me it symbolizes the completion of what you’re supposed to do at The University of Texas,” Perrin said. “People come here on an athletic scholarship, but it’s not just to play sports. They’re there to get their degree, obtain a meaningful degree in a major field of study that they’re interested in and hopefully then find a career they can pursue doing that.”

Like Texas football players before and after him, Redding spent his college days chasing the crystal football awarded each year to the BCS national champions, college football’s top prize before the advent of the College Football Playoff. Soon after he left Texas for the NFL draft in 2003, though, his eyes turned toward a different trophy.

“This was my crystal ball — an education,” Redding said. “I completed my long journey here at The University of Texas. There were days I wanted to quit, days I wanted to give up. It all came to fruition. I got my trophy and it’s on my finger.”

Redding began taking classes in the second year of his 13-year NFL career. In May, at the age of 36, he graduated from The University of Texas.

“It took a lot of coming back here in the offseason, taking classes, maybe one, maybe three,” Redding said. “Taking online courses, sacrificing family vacations and all these things because education was more important.”

Williams, who earned his bachelor’s degree in educational psychology last December and is currently pursuing a master’s degree, left the University in 1999 to embark on a 12-year NFL career of his own. But the T-ring remained on his mind.  

“I remember being here a long time ago and seeing the guys ahead of me with their T-rings,” Williams said. “It seemed far away, but I was hoping one day I’d get there.”

For Williams, the ring marked the fulfillment of a promise he made to himself and his mother, Sandy, who watched as he put on the ring for the first time.

“I just waited on that moment,” Sandy said. “Just to see him finish, get his undergrad and now working on his grad degree, it just warms my heart. It takes me back when they were recruiting him back in San Diego when he was in high school.”

Sandy said she hopes Ricky’s story can serve as an example to the athletes that follow him.

“I told Ricky, until he accomplished finishing his degree and getting that T-ring, he had unfinished business,” Sandy said. “He went to the NFL — it’s okay, you can got to the NFL. That doesn’t mean you can’t come back and finish what you started.”

Perrin recognizes the fleeting window of opportunity athletes face as they consider a professional career. For those athletes, he wants to send a message that the University will be waiting with open arms.

“There is great value in getting your degree, and not necessarily having to get it on the same timeframe as everybody else,” Perrin said. “A young man who’s got a career to play, say, pro football, or a young lady who’s got a chance to play one of the pro sports, you’ve got to do that while your body is at its peak and you can succeed. But for them to come back sends a strong message: ‘Hey, education is important. We believe in it. It meant a lot to us then, and it means a lot to us now.'”

Print Friendly Version

Source: Texas Sports

Powered by WPeMatico

Video: No. 3 Volleyball’s Nwanebu hosts social media series

Video: No. 3 Volleyball's Nwanebu hosts social media series

|
Volleyball

Video: No. 3 Volleyball’s Nwanebu hosts social media series

Longhorn Network features senior Ebony Nwanebu’s social media series, Ebb on the Web.

Print Friendly Version

Source: Daily Texas Online

Powered by WPeMatico

DB coach details what Texas is getting in CB commit D’Shawn Jamison

Houston Lamar High School has become a Division I factory over the years. One doesn’t even need to look further than the Texas Longhorns current and upcoming roster for proof — junior defensive backs Holton Hill and John Bonney currently don the burnt orange, while four-star wide receiver Al’vonte Woodard and and now four-star cornerback D’Shawn Jamison will do the same next season.

Jamison, who became the Longhorns latest pledge on Saturday evening, has spent the majority of his high school career under the tutelage of Lamar defensive backs coach Theadis Reagins, who’s helped send seemingly countless talents to the Power 5 ranks over the years.

Jamison was far from the first, and he won’t even be the last this month — five-star Lamar cornerback Anthony Cook is set to choose between Texas, Ohio State and LSU on Oct. 30 — but for now, he’s the latest to continue the Lamar-to-the-Longhorns pipeline.

Burnt Orange Nation recently caught up with Coach Reagins, who raved about what Tom Herman and the ‘Horns are getting in their latest pledge.

“The thought of just having another DB from Lamar High School get the opportunity to play at a program like the University of Texas is an honor for D’Shawn Jamison and his family,” Reagins said.

An Under Armour All-American and Nike The Opening Finalist, Jamison spent the previous year and a half prior to his senior season blossoming into one of the nation’s most coveted defensive back prospects.

Beginning with UTSA in April of 2016, Jamison went on to add upwards of 30 offers throughout his junior season and final offseason among the high school ranks. By the time his final offer from Auburn rolled in on May 25, the likes of Michigan, Oregon, Notre Dame, USC, Oklahoma State, Penn State, TCU, Texas A&M, and of course, Texas were among those vying for his signature.

Jamison was an elite prospect then, and he’s only taken more steps in the right direction as a senior, with plenty of development still to come.

“The growth he’s shown this year speaks to his commitment during the offseason to be a better leader on and off the field,” Reagins said. “He’s grown in areas such as film study, technique in playing the cornerback position, and he’s gotten stronger in the weight room. The scary part is he has grown so much from his time as a freshman and yet his upside is endless.”

Endless upside considered, there’s almost always an adjustment curve as recruits transition from college prospects to college players. The same will likely be the case for Jamison, as he’ll leave a locker room where he’s currently considered a leader and join one with former elite recruits that have now spent multiple years in a college strength and conditioning program.

When that time comes, Reagins noted relying a bit less on sheer athletic ability as an area Jamison can improve upon — that’s often more than enough at the high school level, but Power 5 football is simply a different beast.

“Coaching Jamison, I see a kid who is very competitive, athletically gifted, and hard working,” Reagins said. “If I could identify area of improvement, it would be to rely less on athletic ability and more on technique.”

That said, Jamison isn’t ranked as the nation’s No. 135 player for no reason — he’s a difference maker and can do so from all over the field. From nickel to corner to safety and even some occasional linebacker, as well as a return specialist, Jamison has put plenty on film throughout his high school career.


247Sports

He’s especially dynamic in the latter area, and with that kind of unique versatility, finding the field as a true freshman shouldn’t prove difficult, as Reagins noted.

“With his ability to play multiple positions in the secondary, and the value he brings to the return game/special teams, he has the talents to contribute right away.”

Two to three years from now, though, special teams coordinators likely won’t be the only ones losing sleep in hopes of keeping Jamison from taking returns to the house, as he’s done so often for Lamar courtesy of a verified 4.48 40-yard dash. A ballhawk in the secondary who’s willing an able to become the aggressor in blitzes and against the ground game, Jamison joins a deep and talented defensive back haul in Austin that will be filling the shoes of Hill, DeShon Elliott and P.J. Locke in the coming years.

More specifically, Jamison’s aforementioned versatility could afford him playing time as a game changer at each position in the secondary.

“Once Jamison gets on campus and learns the defensive system, opposing offenses will most definitely have to game plan for him, because he has the ability to disrupt offenses from numerous positions (corner, nickel, safety),” Reagins said.

A Houston Lamar product being game-planned around a few years into his tenure at Texas — sound familiar?

The impressive measurables, the undeniable instincts, the apparent athleticism, the quality coaching and the work ethic to tie it all together — on the field, Jamison looks the part of a total package coming to Texas.

For as tantalizing of a talent as Jamison is, it’s his support system and the values instilled in him that has the coach that’s experienced his development from a part-time contributor as a sophomore to signing with the second-winningest program in college football history as a senior confident that Jamison will be special in Austin.

“Off the field he’s a very respectful young man… very grounded, Reagins said. “Credit his mom and dad, who are very supportive parents and who have obviously instilled great values within him. He will be a kid that the fans will be just as pleased with off the field as they would be seeing him on the field.”

By December, Jamison’s time as a Lamar Texan will be done. He’ll exchange red and blue for burnt orange and white next summer and take the coaching he’s added from Reagins over the years into a secondary room led by Jason Washington.

Just as he has with so many prospects before, including Hill and Bonney at Texas, Reagins is eager to watch Jamison as he makes the jump to the next level.

“I think it’s a great opportunity for him, Reagins said. “I’m excited to see his development at the next level. Obviously, Coach Herman and Coach Washington did a great job of recruiting him, so my respect goes out to them. More than anything, his parents seems to be happy about the commitment to UT.”

Source: Burnt Orange Nation

Powered by WPeMatico

DB coach details what Texas is getting in CB commit D’Shawn Jamison

Houston Lamar High School has become a Division I factory over the years. One doesn’t even need to look further than the Texas Longhorns current and upcoming roster for proof — junior defensive backs Holton Hill and John Bonney currently don the burnt orange, while four-star wide receiver Al’vonte Woodard and and now four-star cornerback D’Shawn Jamison will do the same next season.

Jamison, who became the Longhorns latest pledge on Saturday evening, has spent the majority of his high school career under the tutelage of Lamar defensive backs coach Theadis Reagins, who’s helped send seemingly countless talents to the Power 5 ranks over the years.

Jamison was far from the first, and he won’t even be the last this month — five-star Lamar cornerback Anthony Cook is set to choose between Texas, Ohio State and LSU on Oct. 30 — but for now, he’s the latest to continue the Lamar-to-the-Longhorns pipeline.

Burnt Orange Nation recently caught up with Coach Reagins, who raved about what Tom Herman and the ‘Horns are getting in their latest pledge.

“The thought of just having another DB from Lamar High School get the opportunity to play at a program like the University of Texas is an honor for D’Shawn Jamison and his family,” Reagins said.

An Under Armour All-American and Nike The Opening Finalist, Jamison spent the previous year and a half prior to his senior season blossoming into one of the nation’s most coveted defensive back prospects.

Beginning with UTSA in April of 2016, Jamison went on to add upwards of 30 offers throughout his junior season and final offseason among the high school ranks. By the time his final offer from Auburn rolled in on May 25, the likes of Michigan, Oregon, Notre Dame, USC, Oklahoma State, Penn State, TCU, Texas A&M, and of course, Texas were among those vying for his signature.

Jamison was an elite prospect then, and he’s only taken more steps in the right direction as a senior, with plenty of development still to come.

“The growth he’s shown this year speaks to his commitment during the offseason to be a better leader on and off the field,” Reagins said. “He’s grown in areas such as film study, technique in playing the cornerback position, and he’s gotten stronger in the weight room. The scary part is he has grown so much from his time as a freshman and yet his upside is endless.”

Endless upside considered, there’s almost always an adjustment curve as recruits transition from college prospects to college players. The same will likely be the case for Jamison, as he’ll leave a locker room where he’s currently considered a leader and join one with former elite recruits that have now spent multiple years in a college strength and conditioning program.

When that time comes, Reagins noted relying a bit less on sheer athletic ability as an area Jamison can improve upon — that’s often more than enough at the high school level, but Power 5 football is simply a different beast.

“Coaching Jamison, I see a kid who is very competitive, athletically gifted, and hard working,” Reagins said. “If I could identify area of improvement, it would be to rely less on athletic ability and more on technique.”

That said, Jamison isn’t ranked as the nation’s No. 135 player for no reason — he’s a difference maker and can do so from all over the field. From nickel to corner to safety and even some occasional linebacker, as well as a return specialist, Jamison has put plenty on film throughout his high school career.


247Sports

He’s especially dynamic in the latter area, and with that kind of unique versatility, finding the field as a true freshman shouldn’t prove difficult, as Reagins noted.

“With his ability to play multiple positions in the secondary, and the value he brings to the return game/special teams, he has the talents to contribute right away.”

Two to three years from now, though, special teams coordinators likely won’t be the only ones losing sleep in hopes of keeping Jamison from taking returns to the house, as he’s done so often for Lamar courtesy of a verified 4.48 40-yard dash. A ballhawk in the secondary who’s willing an able to become the aggressor in blitzes and against the ground game, Jamison joins a deep and talented defensive back haul in Austin that will be filling the shoes of Hill, DeShon Elliott and P.J. Locke in the coming years.

More specifically, Jamison’s aforementioned versatility could afford him playing time as a game changer at each position in the secondary.

“Once Jamison gets on campus and learns the defensive system, opposing offenses will most definitely have to game plan for him, because he has the ability to disrupt offenses from numerous positions (corner, nickel, safety),” Reagins said.

A Houston Lamar product being game-planned around a few years into his tenure at Texas — sound familiar?

The impressive measurables, the undeniable instincts, the apparent athleticism, the quality coaching and the work ethic to tie it all together — on the field, Jamison looks the part of a total package coming to Texas.

For as tantalizing of a talent as Jamison is, it’s his support system and the values instilled in him that has the coach that’s experienced his development from a part-time contributor as a sophomore to signing with the second-winningest program in college football history as a senior confident that Jamison will be special in Austin.

“Off the field he’s a very respectful young man… very grounded, Reagins said. “Credit his mom and dad, who are very supportive parents and who have obviously instilled great values within him. He will be a kid that the fans will be just as pleased with off the field as they would be seeing him on the field.”

By December, Jamison’s time as a Lamar Texan will be done. He’ll exchange red and blue for burnt orange and white next summer and take the coaching he’s added from Reagins over the years into a secondary room led by Jason Washington.

Just as he has with so many prospects before, including Hill and Bonney at Texas, Reagins is eager to watch Jamison as he makes the jump to the next level.

“I think it’s a great opportunity for him, Reagins said. “I’m excited to see his development at the next level. Obviously, Coach Herman and Coach Washington did a great job of recruiting him, so my respect goes out to them. More than anything, his parents seems to be happy about the commitment to UT.”

Source: Burnt Orange Nation

Powered by WPeMatico

Texas WR commit Rondale Moore set to officially visit ‘Horns

Among the handful of the prospects who will be in Austin this weekend is four-star Texas wide receiver pledge Rondale Moore, as the Louisville trinity (Ky.) product is set to officially visit the ‘Horns.

The explosive slot receiver is one of three wide outs currently committed to Texas, along with Houston natives Brennan Eagles and Al’vonte Woodard.

Moore, however, has been considered a flip candidate as of late with Purdue making its push. Moore officially visited the Boilermakers earlier in the month, but now making a return trip to Texas and his first since the summer, the ‘Horns staff will get a personal say in the matter.

Moore committed to Texas on June 25 over options including Ohio State and Louisville.

The 5’8.5, 174-pound Moore is ranked the as the nation’s No. 210 player, No. 40 wide receiver and the No. 1 player in Kentucky, per the 247Sports Composite ranking.

Source: Burnt Orange Nation

Powered by WPeMatico