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Peterson: This college football season will be different from broadcast, advertising perspective, too

You know by now what to expect if planning to attend college football teams this fall. Wear a face mask. Don’t expect to tailgate six hours, if at all. Get used to concession food fitting into a package. Stadiums won’t be at 100% capacity. Prepare for digital ticket-taking and staggered entry.

You’ve already read and heard most of that, though. So let’s now switch to your experience while watching games on TV, where ratings could be as high as ever.

It’s not so much what will be different with College Football 2020, but how networks keep those differences from being overly noticeable.

Game experiences, regardless if they are in the stadium or on the couch, won’t be the same. The goal, though, continues to be making viewers feel as if they’re in the stadium, right along with the lucky reduced crowd who could actually be there.

University of Iowa students are learning how to use LiDAR technology by scanning Iowa landmarks. This image of Kinnick Stadium was made with hyper-accurate data from lasers.

That mindset won’t change. Aside from those less-than-full stadiums and players spaced about the sideline instead of between the 25-yard lines (and referees maybe wearing masks), viewers aren’t likely to see many differences.

Behind the scenes, however, things will be different.

Remote announcers? Probably.

They’ll likely work from a studio in another state, and not in press boxes at the games they’re describing. That’s the biggest difference, from a TV perspective, but it’s something viewers — and broadcasters themselves — eventually will adjust to.